Throwing Back Tokens TED Talks Playlist (curated by Josette LeBlanc)

This afternoon a few course participants asked me if I could email them some of my favorite TED Talks. As I started going through the list in my head, I started visualizing a playlist. Then I imagined what I would call that playlist. And now my imagination has taken me to this post instead of a private email. I guess you could call this a modern day mixtape for educators. :) I hope you enjoy it as much as I enjoyed making it!

The first target of inspiration came from the playlists the wonderful folks at TED started putting together. Below are my favorites so far.

I have pulled out my favorite talks from these playlists, and from the memories etched in my mind. Instead of telling you why each of these talks inspired me, I’ll simply tell you how they made me feel. I’ll unashamedly admit that about 90% of these talks brought tears to my eyes: tears of inspiration, tears of disbelief, tears of joy, and tears of hope. I have watched each of these talks at least twice. These presenters are making an incredible impact on the world, and I have no doubt they will have the same affect on you. I am sure I have missed a few, so please feel free to add your favorites in the comments.

How Education Can/Must Change

Powerful storytellers

The Creative Mind

Mind, Body and Soul

Risking It All for Freedom

Perspectives on Success, Motivation and Leadership

Language

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Writer resources: dictionary and thesaurus

It’s that time again. The time when I help the teacher-trainees in our program get more comfortable with the concept of writing. One of the ways I do this is by doing a session on the benefits of combing a dictionary with a thesaurus (Lesson Planning Flow – Thesaurus PoetryHow Do You Create Smoother Transitions?). I’m often fascinated by the fact that many of my teacher-traineess have barely used a thesaurus. I thought maybe they weren’t alone, and that the email I just sent them could be of use to someone else out there.

The Oxford Learner's Dictionary is another great option (picture courtesy of ELTpics)
The Oxford Learner’s Dictionary is another great option (picture courtesy of ELTpics)

Dear KIETT Writers,

Tomorrow we’ll be writing our narratives. I thought this would be a great opportunity to introduce you to some online resources.

As we get deeper into our writing practice, I’ll be introducing tools that I think are valuable to writers. There are two resources that all writers have by their side when writing: a dictionary and a thesaurus. As we talked about before, if you are interested in developing your vocabulary knowledge, it’s helpful to use English dictionaries that are specially developed for language learners. The one I recommended to you is http://www.ldoceonline.com

I also recommend using a thesaurus http://thesaurus.com/ with your dictionary. When you find a synonym in the thesaurus, but aren’t sure if the word is appropriate for the sentence you are writing, check the definition in the Longman online dictionary. The combination of the thesaurus and the English learner’s dictionary will help you catch the subtle differences between words that a Korean-English dictionary might not be able to do.

When you are writing, I suggest keeping these websites open and available as a writing reference.

Sincerely,

Josette

Applause for the Teacher’s Tickle Trunk

Getting a round of applause at the end of a lesson is definitely a nice little pick-me-up for a teacher. I was fortunate to receive one these after having unveiled one of my favorite magical teaching tools from the ever giving tickle trunk called the world wide web.

Mr. Dressup was my favorite childhood TV personality. He could find any magical item in his tickle trunk.

Continue reading “Applause for the Teacher’s Tickle Trunk”