Celebrating Learners – The Celebration Challenge Continues

Put on your party hats because today we’re celebrating learners!

This is the second entry of the Celebration Challenge series. In last week’s post, Celebrating Teachers, you shared stories of memorable teachers.

For this round of celebrating, describe a memorable student via your blog, email (josette.leblanc@gmail.com), or Facebook, and I’ll post your stories here! (scroll down to see entries)

Disclaimer :P I realize that “memorable” doesn’t imply “good”, but for the sake of this challenge, we’ll veer in a more positive direction. It is a celebration after all ;)

I look forward to your stories! Here are a few from the KIETT participants.

KIETT participants make the switch from teachers to learners

“I have a good memory about a student because of the process of improving his confidence. About 9 years ago, he was just ordinary high school student, but he had a   slight stammer, so his self-confidence was low. (…) Finally, he acted ‘the dwarf’ (in a school play) very well on the stage without stammering. His performance inspired his classmates with pride, and he got his confidence back. I will never forget his patience, courage, and good faith.”

“To begin with, her (student) devotion for her family was quite impressive considering her age, 15. (…) Although I noticed her tiredness when I had the chance to talk with her, far from complaining about her environment, she positively tried to get financial aid to lessen her parents’ burden instead.”

“What I was most impressed by was his personality. Unlike other excellent students, he was not arrogant but modest. He didn’t boast himself nor ignore others. Even though his English was better than mine, he always listened to my class most carefully among the students, and he showed deep respect to me.”

“… she and I shared something in common. She lost her father at an early age. A few days after she entered the middle school, her father passed away all of a sudden. Since I myself lost my father when I was exactly in her age, I totally sympathized with her. ”

” Although I’ve never met her again since I moved to Daegu after marriage, she is still in my memory.”

Teachers Celebrate!

– After celebrating her teacher in the previous post, Katharine Trauger, who blogs at Home’s Cool, now celebrates her student…

“Armando.

Having lived in the U.S. two years, this young man had been mainstreamed into one of our junior high schools, as a method of teaching him English. He excelled in art and P.E., but every class that actually required knowing much English, he was failing. I was brought in to determine if he mightn’t be mentally challenged.

He wasn’t.

His skills in geography were high. He had a strong affinity for history. He understood negative numbers. He was teaching his mother the English he had learned during the day, at night.

He was overloaded with stimuli and had turned off the sounds around him. As we began his tutoring sessions, he, in turn, began opening up, hearing and assimilating those sounds. He worked hard and developed bravery with his new language. He developed a relationship with a buddy who began helping him with the words he needed for survival, on a moment-by-moment basis.

He pulled himself up “by the bootstraps” and actually began conversing on a regular basis. Before I was forced to move to a different school district, he had begun initiating conversations with strangers. He memorized an English poem and recited it in a class project, to a standing ovation.

This spirited and hard worker would survive and I was blessed to have known him.

Next Post

Celebrating learning and teaching!

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5 thoughts on “Celebrating Learners – The Celebration Challenge Continues

  1. There is greatness in humility. Your student was wise both mind and heart. Someone we all should be inspired about. Sorry to hear about loosing your dad at an early age. I dad list his father at an early age took. He was his hero. Have blessed day and thanks for sharing.

    Like

    1. Thank you for empathizing with my students loss. I can’t imagine having lost my father at a young age. One must always wonder how life would have been like with a father’s presence. It’s always a delight to hear from you.

      I apologize if I am crossing a boundary, but could I have your name? I just feel like I know you, but feel strange that I don’t know your name. I understand if you want to remain anonymous :)

      Like

  2. Armando.
    Having lived in the U.S. two years, this young man had been mainstreamed into one of our junior high schools, as a method of teaching him English. He excelled in art and P.E., but every class that actually required knowing much English, he was failing. I was brought in to determine if he mightn’t be mentally challenged.
    He wasn’t.
    His skills in geography were high. He had a strong affinity for history. He understood negative numbers. He was teaching his mother the English he had learned during the day, at night.
    He was overloaded with stimuli and had turned off the sounds around him. As we began his tutoring sessions, he, in turn, began opening up, hearing and assimilating those sounds. He worked hard and developed bravery with his new language. He developed a relationship with a buddy who began helping him with the words he needed for survival, on a moment-by-moment basis.
    He pulled himself up “by the bootstraps” and actually began conversing on a regular basis. Before I was forced to move to a different school district, he had begun initiating conversations with strangers. He memorized an English poem and recited it in a class project, to a standing ovation.
    This spirited and hard worker would survive and I was blessed to have known him.

    Like

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